Allene Cottier

Allene Cottier will conduct a comparative study of the various interpretations of the terms Sovereignty, Self-determination and Indigenous in discussions of American Indian politics. These are critical terms in current discussions of social justice. She anticipates that there will be a fundamental fracture in the use and understanding of these terms among governments and the legal and policy establishments on the one hand, and grassroots Native American communities on the other hand. She will compare the use of these terms (and the meaning behind them), in international legal forums, U.S. Federal forums (including all three branches of government), tribal forums, and Native American communities. This project will move toward theorizing Indigenous Worldview in the 21st century by comparing different perceptions of language used in Indigenous rights claims.

Sabrina Carletti

Sabrina Carletti’s project will inquire into Japanese postwar calligraphy within the Zen’ei bijutsu (avant-garde) movement while focusing on the calligraphy of Morita Shiry_ (1926-1999), who brought radical changes to calligraphy practice by leading the bokujin-kai, or the Human Ink Society. Sabrina intends to depart from the familiar influence model of Japanese and Western avant-gardes by arguing for a more complex understanding of Zen in Japanese modern calligraphy. Sabrina will travel to Japan to study works by Morita at the Museums of Modern Art, Tokyo and Kyoto, and to New York to observe works by Franz Kline and other Abstract Expressionist artists at the Museum of Modern Art. .

Joshua Arribere

Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is critical to development and differentiation, allowing metazoans to generate a large amount of protein diversity from a single gene. Despite its importance, our understanding of the factors that influence this process is limited. The objective of Joshs project is to investigate the role of the Fox family of proteins, which have been implicated as splicing regulators. Through experiments with zebrafish he will asses the effect that Fox has on a library of alternatively spliced exons in the hope of better understanding this protein familys role. Hopefully his project will provide insight into the role of Fox and the alternative splicing events it controls, and possibly some insight into the mechanism any of a number of the genetic diseases caused by aberrant splicing.

Javier Aros

America 2020, a creative vision of the political and social realities of the United States in the year 2020, will be an artistic presentation of Javier Aros. Utilizing room sculpture, six large silkscreen poster prints and assorted smaller prints, two wall paintings, ceramic busts, original flags and interactive historical documents and presentations, Javier will carefully design and create a future museum dedicated to the revolutionary and evolutionary events of the teen years of the 21st century. By thoroughly investigating and evaluating revolutionary methodology and methods — from independence from non-renewable energy to economic reformation and political revolution — Javier intends to illustrate through his art an intuitive, rational and applicable path through the political and cultural straits in which we find ourselves today.

Shahrzad Abbassi-Rahbar

Thalassemia is a disease common to 60 countries worldwide, with high prevalence in Middle Eastern countries. The Iranian population consists of many who exhibit the beta-thalassemia hemoglobinopathy, which reduces red blood cells ability to carry oxygen, and even more who are carriers of this life-threatening disease. In the past, most of the children born with beta-thalassemia failed to survive during the first decade of life. Medical advances have recognized that placental and umbilical cord blood of a newborn is a rich source of blood stem cells, which can replace the blood of a thalassemic sibling and cure him of the disease for life. In this clinical study, Shahrzad will survey and document the need for a sibling donor cord blood program in Tehran, Iran, evaluating the feasibility of establishing such a program.

Randeep Hothi

Morality, as a realm approached by philosophers to be captured by theory and grounded upon metaphysics, as the realm in which the good is discriminated from the evil or the bad by faculties of reason, is subverted by sublime gestures of the poet. These sublime gestures in the prose of Puran Singh have specifically subverted the ethical foundations of Brahmanism and Vedanta through the experience of the Sikh path. Randeep Singh’s research will delve into the Sikh experiences, in dialogue with the Western tradition of metaphysics, to provide some insights into the critique Puran Singh offers of the modernist philosophical idiom rooted in Enlightenment thought. In doing so, Randeep’s travels to Punjab will involve contact with the Punjabi and English prose left for us by Puran Singh.

Nicole Gordon

Current Bio: Nicole completed an MFA at UCLA in Film Production. She’s since been working in cultural programming in the non-profit sector: Palm Springs Int’l Film Society/Festivals, IKAR (ritual and advocacy), and now at Friends Of The Observatory, the non-profit fundraising and advocacy partner of Griffin Observatory in Los Angeles, CA Haas Scholars Project: The placement of a womans body attests to the gender dynamics of a film, so how do recurring spatial settings figure female characters into the collective national imagination? To address this question Nicole will conduct a survey of contemporary womens roles in American and Argentine national cinemas. She will approach this project through a phenomenological lens because phenomenology views the body as a mediated image through which actual historical and cultural expectations emerge. Nicole will assess twenty films made since 1995; she will include mainstream blockbusters that target domestic audiences and experimental films that are screened […]

René Flores

Increasingly, Latino immigrants are steering away from large metropolitan areas, traditional immigration magnets, in favor of smaller, often rural communities. As Small Town USA is transformed by migration, the specter of xenophobia seems to lurk nearby. In recent months, dozens of towns have considered passing laws against undocumented immigrants ranging from criminalizing their labor (Escondido, CA) or penalizing their landlords (Hazleton, PA) to prohibiting their presence in public spaces (Springfield, TN). René will try to discover the factors that motivate the rise of xenophobic sentiments in small U.S. communities. He will spend the summer in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, a town that recently passed strict anti-immigrant legislation and even banned Santa Claus on the grounds that he is an illegal worker. In Hazleton, residents claim, there are no holidays for illegal aliens.

Vi Do

Vi will investigate the nature of state led health care reform in America, focusing on the instrumental political actors that shape the debate. As federal level attempts to solve the problem of the uninsured have failed time and time again, policy innovations to address America’s broken health care delivery system have emerged from the states. The two critical examples are Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act of 1974, which established an employer mandate for health insurance provision and Massachusetts’s newest reform, Chapter 58 of the Acts of 2006, which introduced an unprecedented individual mandate for owning health insurance. Vi will travel to Hawaii and Boston to examine the political climate, actors, and conditions under which these two legislations were passed in hopes of understanding why some states initiate health care reforms while others opt for incrementalism or none at all.

Ziza Delgado

My research analyzes the education reform that took place at UC Berkeley at the end of the 1960s to determine whether social movements such as the Free Speech Movement and Third World Liberation Front affected University curricula and pedagogy. Imperative to the research is a critical discussion of the power dynamic between students and the UC administration. I analyze the effect that the FSM had on curriculum reform, through the creation of a Free University and other experimental programs. The second component of my research looks at the historical context in which a student movement, the Third World Strike, established an Ethnic Studies Department at UC Berkeley that has lasted throughout the years. Crucial to this research is historicizing the different moment in which these movements occurred from 1964-69, and the influence that local, national, and international movements had on the students. This summer I had the opportunity the work […]